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Old 05-02-2012, 05:35 AM   #1
vanakaru
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It seems I hate TimeMachine still.

I never liked it when it came about. A month ago I decided to give it a go again. All looked wonderful - I was able to recover documents and other files and so on.
I do not keep the drive hooked all the time for my good reasons. So today i run a backup again and to my dismay my month old backup is no longer there. The problem was that I had another drive with all my media files (that I back up with CCC when needed) connected and apparently TM was going to backup that as well and obviously had no space - so it reported failed. Looks like it erased all the backups regardless of needing 500gb space and having only 100gb. Feels like a stab in the back to me.
So can I recover my original back-up still.

Last edited by vanakaru; 05-02-2012 at 05:38 AM.
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Old 05-02-2012, 05:50 AM   #2
benwiggy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vanakaru
I had another drive with all my media files connected and apparently TM was going to backup that as well.

Yes, TM backs up everything, unless you tell it not to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vanakaru
I do not keep the drive hooked all the time for my good reasons.

If it's a laptop and you're on the go, then fair enough. If it's a desktop, then I can't think of a reason not to have the backup drive permanently attached.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vanakaru
So can I recover my original back-up still?

Have you actually lost any data? Surely, you still have the most up-to-date versions of all your files on your system drive, don't you?

TM is an excellent backup system, BUT: it works in one way, and one way only. You need the drive connected to your computer. You need to tell it to ignore anything you don't want it to backup. And then you need to leave it alone.
No tinkering, no meddling, no manually telling it when to back up.

I plugged in my external drive when Leopard came out in 2007, and it's been making backups ever since. I've recovered accidentally deleted files and overwritten documents. It's been an absolute life-saver. I've even transferred the backup onto a bigger drive.

I don't know why you don't like TM, but if you don't think the way it works fits your setup, then you should look for alternatives. However, I would recommend letting it do its thing. You might want to give it a bit more space than 100Gb, though.

Last edited by benwiggy; 05-02-2012 at 05:57 AM.
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Old 05-02-2012, 07:21 AM   #3
anthlover
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TM is fine but I do not use it and longer. I use a combination of CCC or Super and Crashplan (great off site secure back up).

As always multiple physical separate disks is important if you care about your data.

What one has to back up often determines how they might be best served. TM and Crashplan specialize in keeping differentials of your data "many snapshots in time". Where they differ is that TM has to deal with the limitation of your back up disk. Crashplan keeps unlimited copies of even your deleted data.

As ben points out 100gb for TM (not counting configuring TM for what you want backed up) is probably not enough, the rolling back ups will eventually take all the space you have. If your data set is say 80GB, 100GB of back up space will not allow for a long timeframe of TM history.

Last edited by anthlover; 05-02-2012 at 07:24 AM.
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:01 AM   #4
vanakaru
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Actually my drive for TM is 160gb of size and the drive I need to backup is about 30-40gb of data. So I think TM will go pretty long way in this situation.
But is it really so that when TM starts to backup everything, but fails due to not enough space the drive it use will be wiped regardless.
What I was hoping to have an easy to use backup where I would find stuff I may need still after erase-install. While I am not without important data as result right nowI hate to think that my plan stopped working so suddenly. I would have brought back many more things from my previous setup when the need would have arise.
I have another backup(copy of a disk) from the same now lost state. So I can access most of the stuff still, but TM was so much easier in that matter. So can I get this copy of a disk into TM?

Last edited by vanakaru; 05-02-2012 at 08:21 AM.
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:27 AM   #5
benwiggy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vanakaru
But is it really so that when TM starts to backup everything, but fails due to not enough space the drive it use will be wiped regardless?

It is certainly true that TM starts deleting your oldest backups when the drive is full. I believe it gives you a warning of some sort when this happens. I can't speak for what happens when your entire backup is larger than the backup volume.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vanakaru
I have another backup(copy of a disk) from the same now lost state. So I can access most of the stuff still, but TM was so much easier in that matter. So can I get this copy of a disk into TM?

Definitely not. Don't try and create a history for TM. This comes under the Golden Rule of not mucking about with TM.
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:37 PM   #6
anthlover
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Im not really clear on your use case, you mention erase and install.

Carbon Copy Cloner has an option not to delete items that have been deleted from the source and will eventually fill up a drive that way (I do not like running CCC that way normally). Crashplan as I mentioned offers a very compelling unlimited storage for computer for around $50 a year and up to 10 computers for $119 a year.

Almost anything can get Fubar'd. Not sure how TM handles the situation that arose by accident normally.

I would say if your data is important keep multiple copies on different disks and use something like crash plan too. You will need to verify the integrity of what you have Source and backups.

Good Luck
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Old 05-03-2012, 10:30 PM   #7
ricede
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benwiggy
I believe it gives you a warning of some sort when this happens.

I always thought that it did too. Until i did a complete restore to my mac & then backed it up. I " forgot " that it would do a complete backup again & it wiped the oldest TM backups, to make enough space, which unfortunately had my old Snow Leopard info in them. ( i had upgraded to Lion but was keeping the old backups in case i decided to go back to SL ) TM did NOT give me any warning that it was erasing older backups.
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Old 05-06-2012, 02:48 AM   #8
vanakaru
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So we need to warned that TM may delete your backups without your consent!

I had some spare time so I backup current state with CCC> restored from old CCC backup> made TM backup on new drive>restored from current CCC backup> backup to TM and here I have files in TM from the month old state. Took few hours to do.
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Old 05-06-2012, 06:44 AM   #9
benwiggy
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IN the TM System Preferences, there's a setting to warn you when old backups are deleted. Alarmingly, it says "warn after backups deleted".

I've got backups going back to 2007, when I first got Leopard. To be honest, I can't think of a situation in which I would need to recover something from that snapshot of my disk, so if it got deleted to save space, I wouldn't worry. The furthest back I've ever recovered something from is about 2 months.

For general purposes -- which is what TM is for -- you're going to need a copy of the current state of your disk, in case that dies; and a couple of prior backups to recover a deleted file or revert to a previous version of a file you've overwritten.

If I lost my entire Backup tomorrow, then I wouldn't really have a problem, because all I care about is the current data on my internal. I could just start another backup from scratch in order to protect that data.

As I've said, TM does one job, and it does it well. If what you want isn't what it does, then you'll need to do something else.

I'm about to buy a new iMac, and when I do, I'll use SuperDuper or CCC to create a copy of my old iMac's disk on an external. I doubt whether a brand new iMac will be able to boot from the MAS version of Lion, but it will be a further source of security in the migration process.
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Old 05-06-2012, 07:12 AM   #10
ricede
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benwiggy
Alarmingly, it says "warn after backups deleted".

Seems a very strange way for Apple to go !! How hard can it be to set it so that the warning comes, before erasure !!

I agree with you benwiggy, most of the time one only needs a few backups. I also hardly ever go that far back. I just got caught out because i REALLY needed a very old backup, in order to revert the entire system, from Lion back to Snow Leopard. My fault for not reading what it said on the tin. I had never before been in the situation where it mattered. I shan't get caught out like that again.
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