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Old 03-21-2012, 01:48 AM   #1
acme
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Fan controller use OK?

I use hardware monitor and SMCFanControl on a 2009 Mac Pro.

are there downsides to using a fan controller? this one allows the users to create settings controlling the speeds of the various fans. When I do 3D rendering for protracted periods, like overnight, I select one of the uptick settings I've created, typically 100 -200 rpm faster than the default, just to make sure the machine's parts are adequately cooled.

Is this practice OK, harmless, or negative to the life of the machine and its parts?

thanks for any thoughts,

a
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Old 03-21-2012, 02:49 AM   #2
vanakaru
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When I use my MBP (early 2009) on live video performance I put the fans run much faster(4000rpm). That helps enormously. The harm may come from using lower speeds than needed to lower noise.
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Old 03-21-2012, 08:21 AM   #3
fracai
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There's also the added wear on the fan, though this is not likely to be significant compared to wear savings by keeping the hardware cooler.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:50 AM   #4
acme
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are Mac Pro or Mac Book Pro fans easy items to come by and install, especially after the machine is discontinued?
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:23 AM   #5
DeltaMac
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If you compare the two Macs, the MacPro fans would be both slower rotating, and longer lived. Even if you run at full speed (you won't like the noise much), I would expect the MacPro fans to last longer. And, you probably would be concerned less about air flow/cooling in the MacPro, than you would with any laptop.
But, if you want to purchase replacement fans proactively, there's various internet sites that specialize in parts for Macs, and MacBook Pro fans would be a common interest, I suppose.
If you know how to get inside your MacPro and MacBook Pro, then replacing fans is not much more challenging than most other parts. If you think that replacing the hard drive in your MacBook Pro is easy, then replacing the fan is about the same.

But, just because the increased speed may affect the life of the fan, that doesn't necessarily mean that your fan WILL fail early. It's just that you would make it more likely to fail early.
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:35 AM   #6
vanakaru
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One more thought. My MacbookPro(rev 4.1) has notorious logic board flaw where graphics chip overheats and comes loose from the rest of the board. I have repaired my two MBPs 3 times in total for the same reason - 150EUR a repair. So I would rather kill the fan early than overheat my logic board.
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Old 03-21-2012, 11:43 AM   #7
acme
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which one is the MacbookPro(rev 4.1)?
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Old 03-21-2012, 11:47 AM   #8
acme
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeltaMac
If you know how to get inside your MacPro and MacBook Pro, then replacing fans is not much more challenging than most other parts. If you think that replacing the hard drive in your MacBook Pro is easy, then replacing the fan is about the same.

But, just because the increased speed may affect the life of the fan, that doesn't necessarily mean that your fan WILL fail early. It's just that you would make it more likely to fail early.

Two important concepts, DeltaMac... with the MBPro, I suppose I can gain some understanding of working on this machine when I do my planned RAM upgrade. Perhaps that procedure requires less skill than a hard drive or fan replacement.

I could see buying replacement fans now for the maybe-they'll-fail-while-I-own-em scenario.

other hand, I have a 13 year old Pismo that still runs without issue..

If today's Mac parts are that good, maybe expecting 13 years isn't unreasonable.

a
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Old 03-21-2012, 12:28 PM   #9
DeltaMac
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In general, upgrading RAM memory is considered to be something that many users can easily do, and Apple usually provides D-I-Y instructions for that. You wouldn't normally get access to the hard drive just to upgrade the RAM. There's some exceptions to that:
The old iMac G4 (with the flexible display neck) has one easy RAM slot, and a second slot that is NOT easy. Most folks call one user-accessible, and the other is the factory slot. And, you still don't have access to the hard drive. That old iMac is full of challenges all over, mostly because of it's compact design. Everything is carefully jammed inside.
On the other hand - a MacPro is super-simple to install or replace a hard drive, and the memory is somewhat less simple, but still something that can be done within a couple of minutes.
The MBPro either has a simple panel on the bottom for RAM access, or the entire bottom case on the newer ones. Those newer ones do give you access to the hard drive when that bottom case is removed. The older MBPros need to have the top case removed before you can do anything with the hard drive. Not a tough job, after doing it once, but not what I would call simple.

Ah yes, the Pismo! I still like 'em! They have a lot of the technology still in use today. I think it's the pinnacle of the G3 processor - well built - folks still use them - they still are useful, at least for some tasks.
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