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Patroklus
06-23-2008, 10:12 AM
Hi,

I currently have a wired (ethernet-based) home network. I'm using a Siemens DSL modem in combination with a Belkin (wired) router. My wife has purchased a Mac Pro laptop and the kids have a Wii, and all have been asking for wireless capabilities. Is there a way to add a wireless access point to an established (wired) network? I am trying to lessen the amount of hassle involved here, simply because it was a nightmare to set up the original wired network. There were compatibility issues between the DSL modem and the router and Belkin's customer service had no idea how to help and it was a good 5 or 6 days before my ISP service finally came up with the idea of setting the modem to bridge mode so that everything finally worked.

So, with everything working now, I'm a bit hesitant to rock the boat by just going out and getting a new (wireless) router. If that is the only sensible way to go, I'll do that -- and make sure I have a supply of antacid pills -- but if there's a way to just add a wireless access point to the current network I'd like to try that. Any suggestions?

NovaScotian
06-23-2008, 10:30 AM
If the Belkin is configured as a bridge which is really just a switch connecting your LAN to the DSL router, I assume the Siemens DSL Router (you don't say which one you have) is acting as the router for your LAN. If you just replace the Belkin with a WiFi router model running in bridge mode, you should be fine.

Patroklus
06-23-2008, 11:00 AM
Actually, it's the Siemens modem (a Speedstream modem) that is in bridge mode. The Belkin router is the router.

NovaScotian
06-23-2008, 01:35 PM
In that case, replacing the Belkin with an 802.11G version ($40), or with any other brand of wireless router should do it. Search around in the Networking Forums here for a suggested brand. I have an AirPort Extreme in a similar setup that works for me: Motorola modem to AP Extreme, used both wired to my G5 and wirelessly to my MBPro.

trevor
06-23-2008, 01:39 PM
Actually, it's the Siemens modem (a Speedstream modem) that is in bridge mode. The Belkin router is the router.

Then it sounds like your router isn't doing anything special or difficult that needs to be preserved. Just replace it with a wireless router. If you are really concerned about keeping your settings, replace it with another Belkin wireless router.

Trevor

Patroklus
06-23-2008, 03:06 PM
OK, I'll try a Belkin wireless router and hope that I don't have to rely on Customer Support for anything. They had no clue how to deal with OS X

trevor
06-23-2008, 03:13 PM
Full disclosure: although my recommendation would be to replace the router, it is possible for you to add wireless capability to your network and keep your current router if you buy a wireless router, connect it via ethernet to your existing router, and put the wireless router into bridge mode.

The reason I don't recommend this method is that then you have two routers sitting there when you only need one. If you replace the existing router, there's a chance that you can sell it (and make some of the expense of the new wireless router back) or give it to a worthy cause (a school, for example). If you add a wireless router and put it into bridge mode, it should work fine, but you've got extra stuff that you don't need.

Also, not all wireless routers support bridge mode. The Apple routers do, from reports on this forum. My current router, which is a Belkin Vision N1, also supports bridge mode. But you'll have to verify that whatever wireless router you decide to purchase has bridge mode as an option if you want to go this route.

Trevor

NovaScotian
06-23-2008, 04:02 PM
OK, I'll try a Belkin wireless router and hope that I don't have to rely on Customer Support for anything. They had no clue how to deal with OS X

There are enough of those out there that you should be able to get pretty good advice here. :)

operator207
06-23-2008, 08:49 PM
Full disclosure: although my recommendation would be to replace the router, it is possible for you to add wireless capability to your network and keep your current router if you buy a wireless router, connect it via ethernet to your existing router, and put the wireless router into bridge mode.

The reason I don't recommend this method is that then you have two routers sitting there when you only need one. If you replace the existing router, there's a chance that you can sell it (and make some of the expense of the new wireless router back) or give it to a worthy cause (a school, for example). If you add a wireless router and put it into bridge mode, it should work fine, but you've got extra stuff that you don't need.

Also, not all wireless routers support bridge mode. The Apple routers do, from reports on this forum. My current router, which is a Belkin Vision N1, also supports bridge mode. But you'll have to verify that whatever wireless router you decide to purchase has bridge mode as an option if you want to go this route.

Trevor

I like this idea, chances are the OP is at least familiar with the Belkin router. He probably knows how to access it, and maybe even update the firmware. If you add another device, yes, it may be a bit messier, but I think the OP will have less trouble taking the entire network offline, replacing the router, potentially having issues with the DSL provider (MAC address allocation/authentication support from ISP for non supported router etc) and then the family complaining that before it was the WII and one computer, now its the entire INETERNET!!!111 ;)

I have been there, and nothing is more frustrating than updating your network, having something not go right, and now having everyone in the house try to help fix it, or just plain yell at you.

Personally, I did exactly this, I bought a Linksys wrt54gl ~$60, installed DD-WRT (http://www.dd-wrt.com) on it, set it up for WPA2-PSK, bumped up the amp to a respectable yet still legal level (2 houses away I can still use wireless, though pretty slow), and set it to an AP (Access Point) only. its been up 48 days without issue.

Patroklus
06-30-2008, 11:13 AM
Well, I did go out and get a Belkin wireless router (a G plus) and, yes, it did take 2 hours on the tech support phone (disconnected twice, three different specialists) before I could get the router to work, but everything works fine now and my wife is happy with her MacBook Pro and the kids are happy with their Wii connectivity.