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ifish42na
06-15-2007, 10:23 AM
I have OSX 10.4.9 installed on my internal as well as external drive. I cannot view the desktop folder contents of the other drive, no matter which one I start up from. The folder contents list is empty, but SpotLight can find their contents. Why are contents of desktop folders from other drives invisible?

I can use Mac Pilot to make them visible, but want to understand the issue.

Hal Itosis
06-15-2007, 03:15 PM
I have OSX 10.4.9 installed on my internal as well as external drive. I cannot view the desktop folder contents of the other drive, no matter which one I start up from. The folder contents list is empty, but SpotLight can find their contents. Why are contents of desktop folders from other drives invisible?

I can use Mac Pilot to make them visible, but want to understand the issue.
Are you perhaps a former OS9 (or pre-OS9) user?
The "meaning" of desktop has been modified for OSX.

While it tries to accommodate the possibility of being mounted
to an earlier OS by providing some aliases, the landscape has
actually changed.

In OSX, the "desktop" is a private folder residing in each user's
domain. User 501 can only see his desktop items. User 502, etc.

OSX has retained some ability to emulate OS9 by showing disks
on the 'desktop'. It is just a visual trick for the user's benefit...
the disks are not mounted there. The concept of a universal
trash was sort of emulated... but users only see a "full" trash
icon if the trash exists in a volume (or user account) to which
they have read permission.

When you say "the desktop folder contents of the other drive", and
"The folder contents list is empty, but SpotLight can find their contents",
it's important to specify full pathnames so we can know precisely
which 'desktop' is being discussed. For the most part nowadays,
the term desktop actually refers to a private folder in a user's home.
But -- due to Finder's visual trickery -- disks (and sharepoints) can
*appear* there as well.

-HI-