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theMouthPiece
05-12-2007, 01:39 AM
Hi All

On the (ahem) PC, when I press ctrl-alt-E I get the letter 'e' presented with the accent placed on the top if it. When I do a similar thing on my Mac I don't. How do I get the accents to appear above letters please...?

Is there a symbol map?

Thanks.

melon
05-12-2007, 01:58 AM
Have a look at this thread: http://forums.macosxhints.com/showthread.php?t=68245

is Option-` and then e.

ˆ is option i
˝ is shift-option g
is shift-option-z (circumflex)
is option-c
is shift-option-c
is option-o
is shift-option-o
is option-a
is shift-option-a
is option-s
is option-y
is option-u
is shift-option l

You can use something like KeyViewer (http://www.macparc.ch/mirror/KeyViewer/) (which is essentially an AppleScript that opens Apple's built-in Keyboard Viewer) to view what keys do what.

For example, run the app and hold down the Option key to see what other keys (like accents) are available (see below). I tend to use this method as I can never remember which key does what.

http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/6416/keyaccenttc4.png

ackkkman
05-13-2007, 10:16 PM
I haven't found a shortcut yet to switch between layouts but I just add the language I want in the International menu in Sys Pref. For me then, I just type as if I was using a German keyboard.

theMouthPiece
05-14-2007, 02:38 AM
I obviously haven't fully understood this as I always thought shift and 2 was the " but on my Mac it's the @ sign.

The image on the key corresponds to the @ sign, but I am used to shift-2 being the " sign.

Ho hum...

melon
05-14-2007, 05:45 AM
I obviously haven't fully understood this as I always thought shift and 2 was the " but on my Mac it's the @ sign.

The image on the key corresponds to the @ sign, but I am used to shift-2 being the " sign.
On all Mac computers I've used (with a British English layout) Shift + 2 = @ only on a PC does Shift + 2 = "

The image I linked to was the the keyboard viewer with the Alt/Option key pressed down (hence the key is grey), this shows what keys do what. Similarly if you press the Apple key or the Shift key, the keyboard viewer will show different things.

Boodlums
05-20-2007, 01:00 PM
I once made a table of keystrokes for both Mac and Windows. I created it in Word. Maybe I should generate a PDF of that handy reference and upload it somewhere... maybe 2 versions of it, since a few things changed along the way from System 7 to OS X....

vickishome
05-20-2007, 03:59 PM
And don't forget the other way to make an symbol. It's very easy to remember.

First, press Option+e. You will see a yellow block with the symbol. Then whatever key you type (in this case an e) will have the symbol over it. In fact, the way I'm able to make the symbol alone in this post is that I'm typing Option+e and then the spacebar. It put an over the space!

There are other quick keystrokes like this, and many are done in a manner that makes sense. Such as the symbol is very commonly used over the e character, so it makes sense that the option keystroke would be the e key. Basically, you just press Option+e and e. It's very quick and simple.

To find the other symbols that work like the Option+e to create , use the Keyboard Viewer that melon suggested. When you press the Option key, you'll notice that certain keys on the Keyboard Viewer will have an orange background. Those are the keys that you can use to create the symbols above letters (my apologies, I don't know what they're called).

So for example, I have the Keyboard Viewer up right now, and it's showing every single key I press. When I press the Option key, these keys show up with an Orange background (font Verdana):

Option+` = ` (if you just press ` without the option key, you cannot put it over any letter. You will JUST get an ` symbol. But by using the Option+` keystroke and then any letter you want, you can create, for example, .

Option+e = to make , as already explained.

Option+u = to make or

Option+i = ˆ to make or

Option+n = ˜ to make ˜e (hmm, that didn't work with the e character?) Let's try the n character: Yup, that works.

Again, to find these special keystrokes, just open the Keyboard Viewer and hold down the Option key. And they'll be very obvious with their orange backgrounds.

voyageur
05-21-2007, 03:09 PM
I'd love to know how to put a horizontal bar over a letter, to designate average in statistics, or mean.
If anyone knows this, I'd be eternally grateful.

JDV
05-21-2007, 03:28 PM
Check your symbol fonts. The chances are excellent that for well-known mathematical expressions, the symbol will already be there. If it's one you use frequently, you can assign a shortcut to it.

Joe VanZandt

Roy Vincent
05-21-2007, 09:40 PM
I'd love to know how to put a horizontal bar over a letter, to designate average in statistics, or mean.
If anyone knows this, I'd be eternally grateful.

Use the character pallete. The Unicode section. The combining overline character 0305. Select that; type your letter with the pallete open; and hit insert on the character pallete.

You can set 0305 as a favorite in the character pallete.

AHunter3
05-22-2007, 12:05 AM
I obviously haven't fully understood this as I always thought shift and 2 was the "

It was... on your basic upright Smith-Corona (http://willdavis.bravehost.com/myPictures/SCORsilenthires2.jpg), Underwood, or Remington manual typewriters.

Been a long long time since I've seen a keyboard like that. I sure used one long enough though.


There was no 1 key: you used a lowercase L (the typeface was of course serif so the lowercase L would resemble a 1); and for an exclamation point you would type a singlequote ' and backspace and drop a period under it, or else hold the spacebar down (it would tick half a space forward on spacebar-down, then the other half a space on release; while down, the carriage could not travel any farther) and type both the singlequote and the period while the carriage is frozen, then release.

tatilsever
05-22-2007, 05:59 PM
Why don't you just check Character Palette?

theMouthPiece
05-23-2007, 12:34 AM
Why don't you just check Character Palette?
How do you do this...?

chabig
05-23-2007, 09:05 AM
Edit menu > Special Characters...

theMouthPiece
05-23-2007, 09:10 AM
Many thanks... :)

voyageur
05-25-2007, 08:40 AM
Use the character pallete. The Unicode section. The combining overline character 0305. Select that; type your letter with the pallete open; and hit insert on the character pallete.

You can set 0305 as a favorite in the character pallete.
Roy, I see that character, but it types the overline in its own space, not over another letter. How do I actually combine the overline and the x in one space?

Roy Vincent
05-25-2007, 11:15 AM
Roy, I see that character, but it types the overline in its own space, not over another letter. How do I actually combine the overline and the x in one space?

Have you got the right overline from the Character Palette? Most of them behave as you've complained. But not 0305. In the Palette, Unicode, highlight line 00000300 (Combining Diacritical Marks) and then below that on line 0300, the relevant overline is #5. Highlight that.
This works in Text Edit as an overline in the same space using the Palette's "Insert". But it does not work in AppleWorks. In AW, the Palette's "Insert" is greyed out. Older Mac apps don't work with the Palette.

There are supposed to be other ways to get an overline. But you'll have to Google (at some length) to get them. One requires using the Extended US keyboard and a specific font (Lucida Grande -- as I remember). There are ways to produce macrons -- lines over vowels to indicate the vowels are long vowels. But they are tied to vowels -- I think.

voyageur
05-25-2007, 12:22 PM
Have you got the right overline from the Character Palette? Most of them behave as you've complained. But not 0305. In the Palette, Unicode, highlight line 00000300 (Combining Diacritical Marks) and then below that on line 0300, the relevant overline is #5. Highlight that.
This works in Text Edit as an overline in the same space using the Palette's "Insert". But it does not work in AppleWorks. In AW, the Palette's "Insert" is greyed out. Older Mac apps don't work with the Palette.

There are supposed to be other ways to get an overline. But you'll have to Google (at some length) to get them. One requires using the Extended US keyboard and a specific font (Lucida Grande -- as I remember). There are ways to produce macrons -- lines over vowels to indicate the vowels are long vowels. But they are tied to vowels -- I think.
Yes, I had the correct overline. But it doesn't work in Word with the fonts I tried (Ariel, Helvetica, Times New Roman). However, thanks to your hint, I found that it DOES work in Word if I use Lucida Grande. Thank you.