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View Full Version : Why can't I burn more songs on a CD? Please help.


raydouble
10-30-2005, 02:24 PM
A CD is about 700MB. So..
Why can I only fit about 18 songs? The songs are about 4MB each, right? In MP3 format? Now, I've heard that to play on a CD player the songs must be converted in .wav files? Is this correct? If so, how the heck big is a .wav file? And shouldn't they be inventing something beter by now?

Now i know that they sell MP3 players for the car so you can fit hundreds of songs on one CD... but I still dont get the reason a CD can't hold about... lets see... 700MB divided by (lets pretend a song takes up a whopping 10 megs) 10. That equals 70 songs I should be able to put on a CD and play in my car. Please help.

gsparks
10-30-2005, 02:29 PM
The problem is that the .wav file you need for the CD player may in fact be more like a whopping 40-50 MB, not 10.

Doing the math gets you to the lower song-count limits.

Sumleilmus
10-30-2005, 03:03 PM
I think most commercial CDs use .aiff.

How many MB worth of .mp3 or .m4a files you can burn to a .aiff CD depends on the rate at which they were ripped. Adding the times gives you a better estimate, since most CD-Rs will only hold 70 or so minutes of music, although some make higher claims.

I bet someone has written an AppleScript to total the playing times of all the items in a particular iTunes playlist.

schwartze
10-30-2005, 04:31 PM
I bet someone has written an AppleScript to total the playing times of all the items in a particular iTunes playlist.

Actually, iTunes does that. It tell you how much time there is per playlist (on the bottom, next to how many songs and how big the playlist is), making it pretty helpful if one is trying to burn a CD, since the length of the playlist in time will not change based on the format the songs are in.

styrafome
10-30-2005, 06:38 PM
Actually, iTunes does that. It tell you how much time there is per playlist (on the bottom, next to how many songs and how big the playlist is), making it pretty helpful if one is trying to burn a CD

It helps to be specific in this discussion. That should say "trying to burn an Audio CD."

The reason you have to be specific is that there are more CD options for burning music these days, which confuse people just like in this thread.

If you want to burn an industry "Red Book" standard CD, the CD must be burned as AIFF no matter what your original format and size is, and AIFF (what iTunes calls "Audio CD") will max out at about 70 minutes but just about any CD player can play it.

If you want to burn an "MP3" CD, you can squeeze 12 hours or more onto that disk depending on the compression. But you have to have a player that can play an MP3 CD. Many newer CD/DVD players can play back MP3 CDs (I've got a stereo component and a portable that do), so the other solution, if you have an MP3 CD player, is to burn that instead of an Audio CD.

raydouble
10-31-2005, 08:15 PM
All I'm saying is that it's pretty crappy that you can only fit about 18 songs on a 700MB CD. Thanx for shedding some light, though.

PCheese
10-31-2005, 08:37 PM
All I'm saying is that it's pretty crappy that you can only fit about 18 songs on a 700MB CD.

So according to you, all the CDs you buy in the store are crappy. ;)

hayne
10-31-2005, 08:39 PM
All I'm saying is that it's pretty crappy that you can only fit about 18 songs on a 700MB CD.

Yeah - and it's pretty crappy that you can only fit 12 average-sized people into an office elevator. Or 5 people into a mid-sized car. Or 15 O'Henry chocolate bars into the glove compartment. Or 30 pairs of socks into a sock drawer.
It's a conspiracy I tell you!
:)

trevor
10-31-2005, 09:49 PM
Not to be picky, but the audio on a Red Book CD is not .wav, nor is it .aiff. Both of those are computer file formats, and the audio CD was not originally made for using with a computer. When you mount the audio CD (CD Digital Audio) on your Mac it is shown as .aiff files because
1. the conversion between CDDA and .aiff is extremely simple--the data is the same but an aiff has a specific header.
2. the Finder makes it appear as an .aiff as a convenience to Mac users.

Trevor

styrafome
10-31-2005, 10:04 PM
Thanks for that clarification, actually...

schwartze
10-31-2005, 11:31 PM
It helps to be specific in this discussion. That should say "trying to burn an Audio CD."

The reason you have to be specific is that there are more CD options for burning music these days, which confuse people just like in this thread.

If you want to burn an industry "Red Book" standard CD, the CD must be burned as AIFF no matter what your original format and size is, and AIFF (what iTunes calls "Audio CD") will max out at about 70 minutes but just about any CD player can play it.

If you want to burn an "MP3" CD, you can squeeze 12 hours or more onto that disk depending on the compression. But you have to have a player that can play an MP3 CD. Many newer CD/DVD players can play back MP3 CDs (I've got a stereo component and a portable that do), so the other solution, if you have an MP3 CD player, is to burn that instead of an Audio CD.

Thanks for the lesson, and I'm not being sarcastic. I guessed that going by the time was a pretty good judge of the ability to burn CDs.

I actually never thought of playing mp3s on anything besides a computer or an MP3 player. A large amount of songs on something which doesn't let me decide how I want them to play them or scroll through them by options (my home CD player) doesn't seem to make sense to me, but the option is out there so I appreciate learning how to address it.

styrafome
11-01-2005, 12:52 AM
TI actually never thought of playing mp3s on anything besides a computer or an MP3 player. A large amount of songs on something which doesn't let me decide how I want them to play them or scroll through them by options (my home CD player) doesn't seem to make sense to me, but the option is out there so I appreciate learning how to address it.

MP3 discs were a short-lived period for me. When the iPod first came out, I didn't like the idea of paying $300-$500 for an easily lost, stolen, damaged, or obsoleted device that only played music. So I burned MP3 discs. The economy of this is that I could put 12 hours of music on a disc, and I bought a $60 MP3 CD player with AM/FM radio and brought it and a single disc on a trip. It was fantastic. For an insanely low price I could carry more music in my travel pack than I ever could on the cassette tapes or CDs I used to carry, and just by burning another MP3 disc I could add another 12 hours of music. When I bought a 5-disc DVD changer for the home entertainment system, by then most of them could play MP3 discs. 5 x 12-hour discs in the changer = 60 hours of music, potentially, if you didn't care to know what you were listening to. Sure beat that trick my friend discovered back years ago where he would make a 6-hour music mix by recording audio to a Hi-Fi VHS tape.:D

It was a short-lived period for me because Apple came out with the iPod shuffle. Finally, an iPod that I didn't feel overcharged for, and easier to use, carry, and manage than the MP3 disc player, even without the screen. And now an old Mac is the music server, so I hardly need to burn MP3 disks, or any disks, anymore.

pink
11-01-2005, 02:42 AM
All I'm saying is that it's pretty crappy that you can only fit about 18 songs on a 700MB CD. Thanx for shedding some light, though.

As it is so often, there is a historical reason (http://www.snopes.com/music/media/cdlength.htm) for that. Actually, with the initial development, it would even have been worse.
At any rate this statement has some humour to someone who grew up with music storage devices that could play 25 minutes of music (or less) in one go (and even those were called "long (!) playing records")...

cheers, pink

raydouble
11-02-2005, 05:20 AM
Guess I didn't really think my comment through.

styrafome
11-02-2005, 10:54 AM
someone who grew up with music storage devices that could play 25 minutes of music (or less) in one go (and even those were called "long (!) playing records")...

I still play those. But they annoy me because after 15-25 minutes, the music stops!

And then there are the scratches...

trevor
11-02-2005, 12:51 PM
And then there are the scratches...

Well, you shouldn't let your little brother play them with his fingernail! Or more seriously, you should get a better turntable. You shouldn't ever get scratches if you take proper care of your LPs and have a decent turntable.

Trevor