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voldenuit
07-07-2005, 06:44 AM
The thread about the p2p judgement

http://forums.macosxhints.com/showthread.php?t=37178

has raised some interesting questions.

Forgive me for quoting myself:
"Some creative mind, a Mac and some assorted tidbits in hard- and software are all it takes to produce books, music and films in a quality indistinguishable from what the industry puts out these days. Of course talent doesn't hurt.

I believe we are about to see a big change in how the market for creative content will look like in the future. If everything goes fine, we'll see new ways of finding the talented nuggets in the overwhelming quantity of mediocre talents. We will probably also see a richer diversity of cultural expression than what can be pushed down the line of today’s industry logic."

In this thread I would like to further explore innovative business models that go beyond the traditional approach. What I have in mind are operations such as:

tidbits.com offering plain pdf e-books on Mac topics: http://www.takecontrolbooks.com

Jason Kottke becoming a reader-supported full-time blogger: http://kottke.org/05/02/kottke-micropatron

A low budget film distributed for free with several interesting ways to pay for it: http://www.route66-der-film.de (german, have your Babelfish ready)

and last not least, Creative Commons with a fresh look at copyright in the digital age: http://creativecommons.org/

I would prefer the focus to be on DRM-free content, concurring with Cory Doctorow:

"Here's what I'm here to convince you of:
1. That DRM systems don't work
2. That DRM systems are bad for society
3. That DRM systems are bad for business
4. That DRM systems are bad for artists
5. That DRM is a bad business-move for MSFT"

Source: http://craphound.com/msftdrm.txt

But obviously discussion about ITMS, and other cases where it is sensible with a compromise, are clearly inside the scope of this thread.

The basic idea that I want to investigate is innovative technologies and business models that allow the customer to pay less, yet ensure more revenue for the actual creators, by leveraging innovative techniques to slash promotion and distribution costs.

Craig R. Arko
07-07-2005, 07:47 AM
This could be an interesting discussion, but please, let's not head down the path of discussing ways around the current system. It's fine to talk about alternatives, but we won't support any conversation about (for example) removing iTMS DRM.

I hope our position is clear and able to be respected.

Thank you.

ArcticStones
07-07-2005, 08:47 AM
Voldenuit,

Thanks for starting a fascinating thread!

This is how I understand your thread: We are ONLY talking about technology and innovation founded on the deepest respect for intellectual property.

Apple has become the runaway leading player in legal music download -- by respecting everyone involved: customers, artists and copyright holders. And for that they deserve applause!

As I understand it, there are a lot of other wonderfully creative efforts out there to sell music, photography and other works directly to the customer. Since the Internet greatly reduces distribution and marketing costs, there is room for great innovation.

Since this does not require middlemen and marketing muscle, there is -- for instance -- a potential for reduced prices to the customer, while giving the artist a greater return. And there is also greater possibility for more people sharing the fruits of their creative efforts, whether in music, creative writing or other fields.

I for one would very much like to hear more about this!


With best regards,
ArcticStones


PS. Craig, thanks for allowing the discussion. :)
And as an author I definitely have a vested interest.

cameranerd74
07-08-2005, 12:11 AM
I would prefer the focus to be on DRM-free content, concurring with Cory Doctorow:

"Here's what I'm here to convince you of:
1. That DRM systems don't work
2. That DRM systems are bad for society
3. That DRM systems are bad for business
4. That DRM systems are bad for artists
5. That DRM is a bad business-move for MSFT"

Source: http://craphound.com/msftdrm.txt
Wow. A good read. I never really thought of it that way, but the author makes some good points.

voldenuit
07-21-2005, 02:13 AM
Glad you liked that food for thought.

It certainly doesn't hurt to be a sci-fi author when it comes to write about otherwise often not-so-entertaining subjects.

I just stumbled across a creative-commons-licensed cartoon in a blog that makes another witty point about the content industry:

http://www.eirikso.com/2005/06/06/how-bob-the-millionaire-became-a-pirate/