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View Full Version : Does anyone else see M$ moving away from Home Computing?


pantherman13
07-06-2005, 07:39 PM
I know that this would never happen in 1293291398098230498103984093849*100000 years because OverLord Gates has a tight grasp on the Computer Market and he is NOT letting go for anything.

However, I have noticed that Microsoft is taking a particularly long time to release Longwayaway, which tells me that they are in no big hurry to impress the world with all their new (HA) and innovative (HAHAHAHA) features. They have also announced that they are going to cut several key features from the OS like the new File system, search, etc. If they really wanted to wow us all they would work their butts off in Redmond and get everything ready and really impress us. I have also noticed that, as much as they claim Longhorn is not going to be Windows XP SP3, it looks almost identical to Windows XP, save some folders and the color of everything.

What I think is the best part is that unless silly-Billy-Gates has 20 Keynotes between now and then to build up the hype, M$ is going to find it near immpossible to sell Longhorn. Oh no! Does this mean MicroSoft won't be able to show off all the new features they have been bragging about for who knows how long?! I shudder to think.

M$ doesn't have nearly the same die-hard, hard-core user fan base as Apple does. In fact, they probably don't even have a fan base. Not once since the announcement of LongHorn have a come across some one who said to me, "Man! I can't wait until Longhorn comes out! I'm going to be the first in line!" Yeah right! Everyone who uses Windows XP is, for reasons that are beyond all human understanding, content with it. Most of the features of Longhorn are going to be under the hood, and thus, people everywhere will say, "I payed $XXX.XX for a Windows XP face lift! #*!$!"

I got off topic there. My point was, has anyone else noticed M$ developing more and more buissness and sever applicatications than anything else? I have. Its all I see in the news about M$.

I would like to re-state the I know that under NO CIRCUMSTANCES WILL BILLY EVER RELEASE HIS GRIP ON THE COMPUTING MARKET.


This is what I mean when I say it looks the same. I can do the same thing with WindowsBilnds! (http://www.extremetech.com/slideshow/0,1206,l=150617&s=25501&a=150625,00.asp)


Incase you couldn't tell, I am not expecting to be floored with Longhorn. From what we have seen, it looks the same. Windows will always be dominated by Mac/OS X in every aspect of the OS market, except maybe compatibility, but that is everyone else's dumb fault for going for Windows 95 because it was the first noticeable one out there. I guess they learned their lesson about Windows 95, didn't they?


Thoughts?

Jim.

Craig R. Arko
07-06-2005, 08:09 PM
Thoughts?

Jim.


I think I'll be watching this thread pretty closely. ;)

pantherman13
07-06-2005, 08:25 PM
What does that mean? Why did you quote where i said thoughts? uh-oh.

pantherman13
07-06-2005, 09:12 PM
I would like to make a correction. Although we do whip Windows, we don't own them. As I understand it, they do have better Networking than Mac OS X. Also, I heard that their Sever Software kicks the crap out of our's when it comes to multiple Connections.

I would really like some feed back on this thread.

Jim.

yellow
07-06-2005, 09:59 PM
They are definitely NOT moving away from the home user. That's a pretty large market for them. If they moved away from it, they would be opening the door for the likes of Linux and Mac OS X. Which translates into lower sales, less revenue, which is bad for stock prices, etc, etc.. definitely NOT moving away from the home user.

Longhorn is taking so long because Windows (up until now) has just been a rehash of earlier OSes. Simply revamped, tweaked, and painted with a new coat of GUI. XP is still based on Windows NT. Longhorn, however, is a completely new OS (supposedly). It's taking a long time because they have a lot of crap to shoehorn into it. Plus a lot of the thing they promised (WinFS :rolleyes: ) just aren't going to happen, so these things get scrapped and then parts of the OS have to be rewritten. Again.

Don't fool yourself, there are PLENTY of Microsoft fanbois out there. PLENTY. Probably far more then there are Apple fanbois. It's simply statistics.

As for people not buying longhorn? I don't think Microsoft really has to worry about that one. People will buy it. If nothing more because it's new, and computer users (Mac folks included) are like lambs being led to the slaughter. "I simply MUST have SoftwareWidget 2.0! It's GOT to be better then 1.9, by virtue of .1!!" People and corps who fight malware of all ilks will be snatching it up ASAP, I bet. Plus, all your new Dells will come with it, or at least the option of it. It'll sell.

Better networking then Macs? I don't understand what you mean.

Better servers? A Solaris server kicks both their butts. Ultimately, it depends on what you're "serving".

mclbruce
07-06-2005, 11:47 PM
OverLord Gates has a tight grasp on the Computer Market and he is NOT letting go for anything.

However, I have noticed that Microsoft is taking a particularly long time to release Long...

Thoughts?

Jim.
Windows NT took a long time to release. Longhorn is nothing out of the ordinary there.

All of this em dollar sign and overlord stuff is just drama. The computer industry was controlled by IBM before Microsoft came along. Things were not much better under IBM's reign and they will not get any better after Microsoft leaves. Someone else will likely replace Microsoft, that's all. You might as well call the sky names for being blue.

bramley
07-07-2005, 03:01 AM
While I agree that MS is not about to move away from Home Computing, I am frankly terrified at some of the new areas that MS is trying to move into

Air Traffic Control: http://www.techworld.com/opsys/news/index.cfm?NewsID=2275

Avionics in Aircraft: <Sorry can't find the URL just now>

I fail completely to understand why something as reliable as UNIX has to be replaced by something considerably less reliable, made by a company previously only known for its PC-based flight simulators.

voldenuit
07-07-2005, 04:23 AM
Just some very brief points:

1
Networking in Windows is code lifted from BSD (which is ok by their license), however they regularly manage to screw up, recently Windows was vulnerable to the eight year old classic Land-exploit again.
Not much superiority to see here.

2
Selling inferior technology to home users is easier than to do the same with tech-savy clients in the server market, just look at the marketshare.

3
Would M$ play by the rules, I wouldn't have a problem with them. Court records are public, feel free to read as much as you can handle. That's what makes it indeed scary when they expand their operations, having a hard time to find enough companies to buy with all that cash flowing in.

4
Their pathetic attempts to pose like they were opening formats and code while trying to hurt especially the competing open source software in every possible way is very far from what I consider fair game. The EUs rejection of software patents is encouraging in that respect:

http://forums.macosxhints.com/showthread.php?t=41762

5
For the rest, it wouldn't hurt to try to be better oneself rather than to whine how Big the others are. If Apple hadn't been so extremely clueless and greedy with their early marketing strategy, the world of operating systems would be very different.

pantherman13
07-07-2005, 06:44 AM
How long after the release of XP did they announce LongHorn? Anyway, if it is taking so long, then it MUST be revolutionary, or a lot of people are going to be upset.

Has anyone else heard the Microsoft said LongHorn is going to be the Windows Platform for the next Ten years? I hope for their sake its great.

That Airplane thing is really scary. Just the thought that they are involved in running airplanes makes me never want to get on a plane again.

pantherman13
07-07-2005, 06:51 AM
Another thing:

Why does it seem like Microsoft is always in legal trouble?

yellow
07-07-2005, 07:14 AM
Why does it seem like Microsoft is always in legal trouble?

A mix of questionable business practices and their overlord of computing status (groups love to take shots at the big dog, be it antitrust, whatever).

mclbruce
07-07-2005, 11:16 AM
Another thing:

Why does it seem like Microsoft is always in legal trouble?

It doesn't look that way to me. I think Microsoft is always getting out of legal trouble. I think they play the legal game very well. They rarely lose and when they do it usually doesn't cost them much, just a few discount coupons for buying more of their software in one major case.

They certainly ate Apple's lunch in the courtroom in the Windows look and feel lawsuit.

yellow
07-07-2005, 11:21 AM
Just imagine how much the can (and do) spend on legal fees. If I were one of their lawyers... OH the HOURS I would bill!

ArcticStones
07-07-2005, 12:34 PM
It doesn't look that way to me. I think Microsoft is always getting out of legal trouble. I think they play the legal game very well. They rarely lose and when they do it usually doesn't cost them much, just a few discount coupons for buying more of their software in one major case.

They certainly ate Apple's lunch in the courtroom in the Windows look and feel lawsuit.

I think that by and large you are right. They are masters at playing the legal game. And in the few cases where they lose, they have done a careful cost-benefit analysis meaning they nevertheless are net winners.

But as I understand it, MS has suffered a number of costly setbacks at the hands of European Union anti-trust actions.

Closer to home, here in Norway, our Minister of Modernisation (yes, we do have such an animal) announced that as of the end of 2006, proprietary formats would no longer be accepted in electronic communications between citizens and the government. That is a victory for Open Source and true standard formats. In other words, at least in this significant part of our humble national market, Microsoft has been warned that it risks becoming irrelevant.

With best regards,
ArcticStones


PS. Perhaps the language in some posts could be a bit cleaner and more serious? The euphemistic explitives serve neither to clarify nor amplify the message. Their creativity does, however, serve to entertain. ;)

fat elvis
07-07-2005, 02:27 PM
it's not that MicroSoft plays the legal game well, they have oodles and oodles of cash. the EU managed to bitchslap them...but IMO it was to make an example of them as well as give the US Administration the finger.

oOdo they use the finger in Europe? someone from across the pond needs to chime in

kawliga
07-07-2005, 02:45 PM
Microsoft is most definitely not leaving the home computing market. If anything they're gearing up to accomodate changes in how the PC fits into a home entertainment setup.

They've got some new product that streams music to an Xbox over a LAN and Longhorn will certainly have new features intended to battle the Mac Mini as a cost effective way to make the PC the center of the home.

My Mac and iPod has replaced all my audio players. I expect someday a Mac will be my Tivo as well.

pantherman13
07-07-2005, 03:49 PM
I never said they were bad at making legal moves. I just said that they always seem to be in legal trouble.

Follow-up question:

Show of hands, how many people on this site and in the world really use MediaCenter to stream pictures to their computer or some other location.

My dad just bought a new computer and it came with Media Center Edition. That is one thing Microsoft did right. My only complaint is when we hooked up a cable line, and downloaded the programs to view in the guide, all the channels are wrong.

I just can't see the practicality in streaming photos to a tv, unless you had some distant relatives come to town. Thats probably it.

CAlvarez
07-08-2005, 03:25 PM
Longhorn is a huge disappointment from the look-and-feel perspective. It looks and feels pretty much the same as XP/2003. In 2003 we already have an updated interface which is in some ways more like Longhorn than XP. When I run Longhorn, I feel like I'm just using a slightly modified XP/2003 UI rather than something new.

The big news is in the kernel and underlying OS, not the UI. There are vast improvements there. Unfortunately the file system was one of those things, but there are major improvements in OS security.

Unfortunately, the UI needs a lot of work. The UI is why I switched to using Macs while I sell and support Windows.