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View Full Version : In the face of the transition, what to do ?


dukeinlondon
06-10-2005, 03:53 AM
My opinion is that there is quite a while to wait before anything happens. I wouldn't buy the first release of the software hardware combo so I am left a bit lost.

I was going to trade in my ageing g4 powerbook for a faster greater one but it doesn't seem such a great idea now. Even if I don't buy that much software, I can tell some things will quickly stop being updated (like yahoo messenger). it might turn out not to be the case but how could I tell ?

I could run Linux as I do on my desktop but hardware support for laptop specific stuff (modem, suspend/resume etc...) is there, but it's hard to figure what machine to buy.

And buying a windows box, well, I am not that hot on that one. So I am a bit pissed off really.

What's your reaction ?

hayne
06-10-2005, 05:03 AM
I think it more than likely that new software releases will continue to support the PPC Macs for some years after the transition to Intel is complete (end of 2007). It won't be much effort at all for a developer to keep on compiling the "Universal Binary" that will support both PPC and Intel. And there will still be a large percentage of PPC Macs in use.

So if you buy a new PowerBook now, it is likely that you will still be able to make use of the new software releases until 2010 or so (2007 + 3). That is probably longer than the expected working life of a PowerBook.

mclbruce
06-10-2005, 09:14 AM
Many more G4 Powerbooks will be sold before they go away. The more people that buy their G4 Powerbooks after you do the longer yours will be supported. That's simple economics. Software manufacturers still want to make money and they will respect the market somewhat.

Apple doesn't always meet it's announced ship dates. I'd say that there will be a Mac Mini on Intel for sale by the holiday season in 2006, and Intel Powerbooks will be announced at MacWorld 2007 but may not ship for a month or three after the announcement. Intel Power Macs could be much farther away in time than that. I wouldn't even consider waiting for a new Powerbook now. When Intel based Mac Minis hit the stores then waiting may make sense.

Yahoo messenger is not a good example. It hasn't been updated for almost two years. It wasn't going to be updated even if Apple stayed with PPC unless some new OS release made it stop working.

kansaigaijin
06-10-2005, 02:33 PM
the new iMac appeared when sales of the old one finally tanked. Same with the iMac G4-G5 transition. If PPC units tank, Intel machines will roll. iPod can only carry the company so far.

mclbruce
06-10-2005, 03:07 PM
If PPC units tank, Intel machines will roll. Apple needs software to sell Intel machines. For example introducing an Intel mini a year before MS Office will run on it will not work for Apple.

kansaigaijin
06-10-2005, 03:36 PM
Apple needs software to sell Intel machines. For example introducing an Intel mini a year before MS Office will run on it will not work for Apple.


Rosetta will run it.

mclbruce
06-10-2005, 05:09 PM
the new iMac appeared when sales of the old one finally tanked. Same with the iMac G4-G5 transition. In the iMac G4-G5 transition, Apple went for a couple of months with no iMacs to sell. They had to apologize about it on their web site. Words to the effect of: "Sorry, we thought we'd have the iMac G5 ready by now but we don't. Come back in September." Let's hope they don't repeat that.

kansaigaijin
06-10-2005, 05:21 PM
not to get snippy but that doesn't refute what I said. The problem was sales of the G4 had gone flat. It was too expensive to produce and the anticipation for the G5 iMac was too great. Classic Osbourne effect. It may have been a screw up not having the G5 ready to go, but killing the G4 iMac and flushing it out of the pipeline may have saved them selling them off cheap after the G5 was available.

the dilemma? keep making G4s nobody wants and then having a bunch of heavily discounted units out there, or kill it and create demand for the G5 when it arrives?

mclbruce
06-10-2005, 08:55 PM
Getting back to the original question it's remotely possible that when dukeinlondon can't wait any longer to buy a Powerbook there may be none to buy. If Freescale ramps down G4 production before Apple gets it's Intel Powerbook out the door that could happen. I still think it's a good idea to buy now if you want a Powerbook now.

There are other threads for more general speculation and information about Intel Macs. I've been guilty of turning this thread into a general speculation thread but I think I'll make any further comments in one of the other threads.

kansaigaijin
06-10-2005, 09:03 PM
it is entirely speculation.

Apple is a small customer of Freescale. the vast majority of their production goes into embedded systems. they have other customers for the G4.

then again to follow my own arguement above, if nobody is buying Pwerbooks in anticipation of Pentium Mbooks, then ya, they could stop production.

Some how I don't think it would get that bad. More likely it is the desktops that will go south.

dukeinlondon
06-11-2005, 02:39 AM
Getting back to the original question it's remotely possible that when dukeinlondon can't wait any longer to buy a Powerbook there may be none to buy. If Freescale ramps down G4 production before Apple gets it's Intel Powerbook out the door that could happen. I still think it's a good idea to buy now if you want a Powerbook now.

There are other threads for more general speculation and information about Intel Macs. I've been guilty of turning this thread into a general speculation thread but I think I'll make any further comments in one of the other threads.

I will sell the oldish powerbook and take it from there.....Now I know what I don't like in the whole thing. Did anybody spot a clear statement of how long Apple would support OSX powerPC after the release of Intel based hardware ? Is Leopard going to be released for them ?

hayne
06-11-2005, 05:45 AM
Did anybody spot a clear statement of how long Apple would support OSX powerPC after the release of Intel based hardware ? Is Leopard going to be released for them ?
Nothing definite was said, but since it won't cost Apple much to continue support fro PPC Macs, I imagine it will continue for several years after the Intel transition. The percentage of PPC Macs in use will be quite high for some years.
But as to Leopard in particular, since that is likely due to be released quite soon after the end of the PPC Macs, it would be extremely unlikely that it wouldn't support PPC - a majority of Macs in use at that time will still be PPC.

Phil St. Romain
06-11-2005, 09:15 AM
Moving to Coat Room . . . attempting to keep Software News and Reviews for, well, software news and reviews. :)

Markle
06-11-2005, 04:46 PM
<< since it won't cost Apple much to continue support fro PPC Macs, I imagine it will continue for several years after the Intel transition. >>

This is what could and should happen. But history tells us that Jobs' Apple drops the hammer on "yesterday's" technology very fast. Third-party software support doesn't disappear quite as fast, but it too starts fading away after a while. I can tell you from my own experience that it's not easy living on a discontinued Mac platform. As of this past week people know that the PPC Mac is a dead-end. I totally understand the reason for this huge decision and the fact that Apple was facing a CPU problem with no easy or clean solution. But that doesn't change the reality that people who are aware of what's happening are not going to be eager to buy into a platform that's finished.

Software can be updated in subsequent versions; hardware is a different story. The mind boggles at the plunge in sales that Apple will now have for at least a year or more. The iPod has been less than half their revenue. How much of their famous cash reserves will be left by the time the Intel-O'Macs hit the market? We know now that Apple had suspicions for a while that something like this might have to happen, and was keeping its options open by compiling recent versions of OS X to also run on Intel*. But Apple had to have assessed its CPU situation as awfully desperate to have finally taken such a drastic step.

Markle

*And who knows if all that extra code contributed to the bloat that made OS X so sluggish?

kansaigaijin
06-11-2005, 05:51 PM
"But history tells us that Jobs' Apple drops the hammer on "yesterday's" technology very fast. "

can you provide an example?

"We know now that Apple had suspicions for a while that something like this might have to happen, and was keeping its options open by compiling recent versions of OS X to also run on Intel*"

Steve Jobs said that "every Mac project" since the introduction of OSX has had to run on Intel.

yellow
06-11-2005, 06:20 PM
I would think that Apple's move from OS 9 to OS X should teach us a little about what the transition will be like from PowerPC to Intel. What about the move from 68k to PowerPC?

mclbruce
06-11-2005, 11:33 PM
I will sell the oldish powerbook and take it from there.....Now I know what I don't like in the whole thing. Did anybody spot a clear statement of how long Apple would support OSX powerPC after the release of Intel based hardware ? Is Leopard going to be released for them ? I think Apple is being generally reassuring while deliberately being evasive on specifics of how long they will support PPC. Leopard will be released for PPC as far as I know.

"But history tells us that Jobs' Apple drops the hammer on "yesterday's" technology very fast. "

can you provide an example? The move from ADB and AppleTalk/LocalTalk to USB happened very quickly. There was one machine that had ADB and USB, none that had AppleTalk and USB. There was no advance notice as I recall. Apple just dropped the USB iMac on the world and people had to deal with it. SCSI to FireWire was pretty fast as well. I'd say those are extreme examples, but they did happen under then iCEO Jobs.