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Macaholic G5
01-11-2005, 03:15 PM
Here it is; F-O-L-D! Just sit back and let your Mac do all the hard work even when it's not working!

Every second of the day, millions of computers around the world are sitting around doing nothing at all. In fact, it’s been estimated that roughly 99 percent of the average personal computer’s processing power is idled and hence wasted. Why let your Mac or PC idle CPU cycles go to waste when they could be doing something really worthwhile? The next time you leave your keyboard and screen - or even pause to read a web page - your computer could be working on a cure for AIDS, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease or certain types of cancer.

How, you may ask? By participating in a distributed computing project called Folding@home based at Stanford University. Since October 2000, the project has enlisted individual computer owners worldwide to donate their machines’ unused processing power to model the self-assembly or “folding” of protein molecules. Working together, the project’s network of over 100,000 personal computers is 100x more powerful than any supercomputer. Is the science good? Absolutely! Results have already been published in several landmark scientific papers. Check out the published article in the October 2002 issue of the scientific journal Nature at http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature01160

Join us and put your unused computer power to work! All you need are 1) a Mac or PC with at least a 300 MHz processor, running OSX or Windows and 2) internet access. (Linux versions are also available) The folding program from Stanford installs effortlessly and runs at the lowest possible priority so that it immediately “gets out of the way” whenever your computer needs power for something else. You can play games, burn CDs, retouch photos, without the slightest change in the responsiveness of your system. The only difference you may notice is that the fans run more often. When you begin Folding, the program downloads a work unit (wu) and starts crunching through its computations. When it finishes, the program uploads the results and gets another unit. Depending on your setup, it can all be done automatically.

To keep things interesting for participants, the project uses a point system that helps people keep track of their project contributions. You can also create or join “folding teams” that offer technical support, camaraderie, and friendly competition for project ranking. There are thousands of teams in the project.

Why join Folding@home? Many of us have family or friends who have suffered or died from one of the diseases mentioned above. We want our children to enjoy a future free of those diseases. Now, ordinary computer users with no specialized research training can help investigate, and someday cure, debilitating and/or fatal diseases - all at minimal cost in time, money or effort. Most of us folders have also made new friends and had fun along the way. IMHO you’d be hard pressed to find a nicer bunch of people, overall, than the participants in this project. Why hesitate?

If you would like to learn more, come visit the Team MacOS X Forums at http://teammacosx.homeunix.com/foru...in/ikonboard.pl Have a look around a little to get a feel for us. Engage us in a discussion or two. Check out our links to learn more about the project – or try these:

An article written by one of our team members for her Mac user group newsletter: http://www.ismug.com/atree/0402/atr...foldingproteins

An Apple.com "Science Profiles" article from mid-2002 on Dr. Vijay Pande, the project director: http://www.apple.com/science/profiles/stanford/

Another Apple.com article from March 2004 on Folding@home and our team captain Noah Johnson: http://www.apple.com/science/profiles/proteinfolding/

If you’ve gotten this far, thanks for staying with me. I hope to see you at our forums or read your comments below.

yellow
01-11-2005, 03:46 PM
Date of last work unit: 2005-01-10 15:49:55
Total score: 18181
Overall rank (if points are combined): 19143 of 413442

Macaholic G5
01-11-2005, 04:21 PM
Nice! Glad to see the Folding@home project is getting around in the Mac community! Tell all your friends and family! Foldin' is golden!

Date of last work unit
2005-01-11 12:16:24

Total score
3027366

Overall rank (if points are combined)
12 of 413445

jeffo
01-12-2005, 01:37 PM
hey macaholic and yellow, how long have you been doing this? what is an average time frame for completing one WU? what machine is it running on?

cwtnospam
01-12-2005, 01:46 PM
I've been doing it for a little over a year. Only the last 7 months on a G5 though, and only as a screen saver. I also do www.d2ol.com as two background processes, one per processor! My Folding stats:

Date of last work unit
2005-01-10 17:24:39

Total score
12283

Overall rank (if points are combined)
27992 of 413695

Active processors (within 50 days)
1

Active processors (within 7 days)
1

yellow
01-12-2005, 02:17 PM
I've not been doing it for much more then 4-6 months.

Macaholic G5
01-12-2005, 05:00 PM
hey macaholic and yellow, how long have you been doing this? what is an average time frame for completing one WU? what machine is it running on?

I've been part of F@h since February 2003. Before that I did SETI@home. Check out my .Mac Homepage (http://homepage.mac.com/macaholicg5/Menu9.html) to see all the hardware I fold with. Frame times can vary from one processor to the next. Let me know which machine you are looking at for frame times and I can give you more details. Be warned, my homepage is not for the faint of heart! ;) Semper Fold!

jeffo
01-12-2005, 05:33 PM
Semper Fold! .... that is some funny stuff! lol

I have an extra G3/266 sitting around that i was thinking about running the client on pretty much full time to test it out with. it does not take much HD space does it.

Macaholic G5
01-12-2005, 06:16 PM
No. Some people actually run folding on USB pen drives. That G3 should make the deadlines if it does nothing but fold. Give it a try. If it will not complete regular work units you can set it to accept "timeless Tinkers" if you use the CLI client and then it really won't be a problem at all. If I've fold you once, I've fold you a thousand times! Just fold it!

jeffo
01-13-2005, 03:11 PM
i installed it last night on said G3 and this morning i looked when i went to work (roughly 12 hours later) and it was a whopping 1.75% done! WWOOOOOHHHHOOOOO!!!!! The job it is doing now says that the max time is like 68 days so i don't think it will be a problem to meet the deadline at all.

that is all that machine will be doing for like 99.998% of itslife because i set it up to play some cheesy old games when i get a chance and i dont get a chance very much.

once i got it going on that one i put it on my dual G4 and this morning it was about 5% done after only about 8 hours. big difference. the problem with this is that it is using both processors at about 50%, I was expecting it to use both at 100%, am I wrong?

KA4EYT
01-13-2005, 03:53 PM
I cannot think of a better way to use those otherwise wasted cpu cycles of all of these Macs of mine. :cool:

This is an important scientific cause and worthy of consideration by everyone! Check out the Stanford site when you have a chance.

The Team Mac OSX Forum members are one of the friendliest groups around - and graciously helpful (like everyone here at macosxhints!).

Count me in! Big time. :)

cwtnospam
01-13-2005, 04:23 PM
the problem with this is that it is using both processors at about 50%, I was expecting it to use both at 100%, am I wrong?
They're low priority processes. If you know what you're doing in Unix, you can increase their priority.

jeffo
01-13-2005, 05:27 PM
I know you can change that in the CLI but i just didn't know if there was some setting i was missing. i think i would rather it running like it is actually, that machine kicks out the heat just sitting there idle so i don't think i want to have the processors cranked 24/7. either way, even though they are low priorities shouldn't it still crank the processors up and then give up cycles when something with a higher ranking calls for the CPU?

I am curious to see how much those two machines will have done by the time i get home in a few hours.

cpragman
01-13-2005, 05:56 PM
Thanks for the tip. Today I joined the Mac OS X team.

cwtnospam
01-13-2005, 05:57 PM
I'm not sure, but I think that low priority generally means that there's a limit to how much processor time a process gets even if nothing else is running as well as less processor time when something with a higher priority is.

Macaholic G5
01-13-2005, 09:05 PM
the problem with this is that it is using both processors at about 50%, I was expecting it to use both at 100%, am I wrong?

Thanks for joining up! Now for the processor usage. Are you using InCrease to control the CLI clients? Looking at my PM G5 Dual 2.5 activity monitor I show 100% for each processor. 1 CLI client per processor.

MBHockey
01-13-2005, 09:53 PM
How do i sign up for Team MacOS X? Do i just enter a number into the Team Number field within the application's preferences? (using the GUI version; 5.02)

KA4EYT
01-13-2005, 10:56 PM
How do i sign up for Team MacOS X? Do i just enter a number into the Team Number field within the application's preferences? (using the GUI version; 5.02)

The instructions on the team site can lead you through this. Please register on the site - and post if you have any questions.

YES. The Team number is 1971. Make sure that you pick out a unique username so that you will be able to follow your stats easily. Don't use an email address.

Take a look at the application "InCrease" on the team site. It gives you all the advantages of the GUI, is a snap to install (it sets up the CLI for you - you just set a few preferences), and also may even double your production.

Welcome aboard and THANKS!!

Macaholic G5
01-20-2005, 09:13 PM
Here you go! Proof positive that those spare CPU cycles are paving the way to a better tomorrow! Directly from the Folding@home News blog.

1/15/2005 First results from Folding@Home cancer project published. We have been studying the p53 tumor surpressor and our first results on p53 have recently been published. To our knowledge, this is the first peer-reviewed results from a distributed computing project related to cancer. Thanks to the continued support of FAH donors, this is will be just the first of many cancer related works that will come from FAH.

The nature of our results can best be described in our paper. However, here's a brief summary of our results. Roughly half of all known cancers result from mutations in p53. Our first work in the cancer area examines the tetramerization domain of p53. We predict how p53 folds and in doing so, we can predict which amino acid mutations would be relevant. When compared with experiments, our predictions have appeared to agree with experiment and give a new interpretation to existing data.

Feel free to take a look at the full abstract here (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_aset=B-WA-A-W-AB-MsSAYVA-UUW-AAUYVCWWWZ-AAUZUBBUWZ-YCYEWBCBB-AB-U&_rdoc=1&_fmt=summary&_udi=B6WK7-4DTKYCJ-4&_coverDate=01%2F28%2F2005&_cdi=6899&_orig=search&_st=13&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=0dab1a5dbe88480377f647bf9c9b61b5). FOLD, it does a body good!

jeffo
01-21-2005, 08:33 AM
with the randomness i have been running it on my G4 it should finish up with the first protein today by the time i get home so i will be on the boards! wooohooo!

daniel3625
01-21-2005, 08:51 AM
will it work on pc?

Macaholic G5
01-21-2005, 09:59 AM
You bet your boot disk! It will run on MacOS X, Windows, and Linux flavors! Check out the team forums for helpful installation software and notes for the best settings. The clients and cores must, however, be downloaded directly from Stanford. Hope to see you around the forums and stats pages! Folding is as folding does!

MBHockey
01-21-2005, 10:12 AM
You bet your boot disk!

hahahah :D :p :)

daniel3625
01-22-2005, 08:53 AM
Started folding today

Date of last work unit2005-01-21 07:35:40
Total score69073
Overall rank (if points are combined)4257 of 417222
Active processors (within 50 days)12
Active processors (within 7 days)8

Macaholic G5
01-22-2005, 04:13 PM
Sweet! Ebert and Roeper give that two thumbs way up! Thanks for joining the project! Fold if ya got 'em! :)

jeffo
01-25-2005, 08:41 PM
well i started my own team just because i wanted to keep track of which of my computers was doing how much work and that seemed the easiest way. no real reason why i want to keep track of that other then curiousity, but i have completed 2 WU so far and here is my team stats. (I have three computers working on it, but only one has completed any WUs so far.)

Ozzieburn_FAH_on_X

Date of last work unit
2005-01-22 16:16:49

Active CPUs within 50 days
1

Team Id
41990

Grand Score
281 (certificate)

Work Unit Count
2 (certificate)

Team Ranking (incl. aggregate)
10221 of 35863

Home Page
http://www.ozzieburn.com/fah/

Las_Vegas
01-25-2005, 09:46 PM
As a member of any group, you can check your personal score at any time. The groups tend to promote a team effort as well as some healthy competition.

Macaholic G5
02-02-2005, 03:47 PM
Whatever it takes to get you going, just do it! Those of you wanting to learn more about the future of Folding@home and hear it from Dr. Vijay Pande himself, please check out the exclusive interview (http://teammacosx.homeunix.com/forum/cgi-bin/ikonboard.pl?act=ST;f=26;t=1531) conducted by Noah Johnson. Thanks to all of you that have taken the time and effort to join the project. Currently Folding@home has harnessed 180,000+ CPUs donating cycles! Outstanding! More is a good thing! :)

Rokcet Scientist
02-10-2005, 12:20 PM
Where's your critical eye, gents? If you do this you'll be providing free processing power to Stanford's research operation. What do universities do with important results of research? They SELL it to the pharmaceutical industry! So they make money out of YOUR cpu cycles! And what does the pharmaceutical industry do with those research results? They make HUGE profits! On YOUR investment!
Naaah, the distributed computing principle is extremely interesting, but I'm definitely not going to finance Universities OR shareholders for free!

MBHockey
02-10-2005, 12:27 PM
Yes, but it isn't costing you anything to do it, and in its most fundamental sense it is helping people. Try not being so cynical!

vancenase
02-10-2005, 02:38 PM
unless dr. pande has an agreement or collaboration with a company, the results are not directly given to those in industry. with that said, if he is working from a government grant and publishes his work in scientific journals (which he does), anyone, and i assume anyone can be industry, can use that information, as it is now in the public domain so to speak.

your (and my) tax dollars paid for his research (if the project is funded by the government)

and it is, the NIH and NSF: http://folding.stanford.edu/about.html

i didn't see any mention of pharma's ... but i could have overlooked something on the site.

generally, that only applies to published research ... so things that are ongoing, such as the computations currently clicking away on your computers at this moment, have not been published, so the information is not freely available (at the moment).

... i just wish i there was a distributed computing project for people to help me finish my research!

susato
02-16-2005, 03:15 PM
Rokcet Scientist writes What do universities do with important results of research? They SELL it to the pharmaceutical industry! So they make money out of YOUR cpu cycles! And what does the pharmaceutical industry do with those research results? They make HUGE profits! On YOUR investment!


That is SO not true! Stanford's Folding@Home results are being published in peer reviewed scientific journals - meaning first that other scientists are looking carefully at the results to make sure they are valid, and second that the results are available for anyone to read and use.

The first 10-12 papers from the project (http://www.stanford.edu/group/pandegroup/folding/papers.html) are mostly about the Folding@Home method itself, demonstrating its validity. More recent papers explore the interactions of water with model proteins (dissolved in water) to determine the role that water plays in folding. One very recent paper examines the way in which two protein chains come together inside the body to create an active tumor suppressor complex. These papers have long term relevance to development of treatments (and preventive measures) for protein folding related disease states, but have minimal financial value to Big Pharma. If the F@H project was testing the interactions of proteins with specific "drug candidates" (as the Find-a-Drug distributed computing project attempts to do) and looking for patents, then you might have a point - but that is NOT what F@H is doing.

The F@H project is long term research on the rates and mechanisms of protein folding and misfolding. The Pande group, and many of us participating "folders", believe this research to be highly relevant to development of effective treatments and preventive measures for AIDS, cancer, and Alzheimers. Pande and the Folding project are laying the foundations for a better understanding of protein folding. Their results will be equally useful to the pharmaceutical industry AND to practitioners studying alternative (e.g. herbal, dietary) treatments such as turmeric for Alzheimer's. AND the research is likely to bear fruit in many other areas - diagnostics, implants, anti-aging measures, wound healing, prevention of autoimmune disease, design of nanomaterials and protein catalysts for industrial chemical reactions, the list goes on and on.

This project is strong independent basic research, funded by scientific agencies of the US government (National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health) because of its intrinsic merit and its potential to move scientific knowledge forward. I suggest that you take a look at the project's website (http://www.stanford.edu/group/pandegroup/folding/) before making groundless and cynical accusations.

Folding@Home is a fine project. I consider myself privileged to participate in it and to introduce it to other computer owners. Come up with a valid criticism of the project and I'll be glad to debate with you about it - but please, spare us the tired old tape-loop of anti-pharma polemics. Not only is it a lot more complicated than you think it is, it simply doesn't apply here.

vancenase
02-17-2005, 01:36 PM
nicely said, susato!

mkoreiwo
02-22-2005, 07:45 AM
Now that I've got both cpu's crunching proteins, the only thing I would like is the ability to save an image of the final product! It would be like an art gallery of the work done. But since they are sent back when complete, we have no way to see what we have done...

sawdust123
01-18-2006, 09:26 PM
well i just started folding. I think? where do you get that info about points and stuff? I followed the directions so hopefully i did everything correctly

thank you

cwtnospam
01-18-2006, 11:07 PM
http://www.stanford.edu/group/pandegroup/folding/stats.html

mkoreiwo
01-19-2006, 06:46 AM
Here is another stats link....

http://folding.extremeoverclocking.com/team_list.php?s=

You can see a lot more here...

Are you using Increase? the Gui client S/W comes with FPD, which allows you to look at your work in progress...

cpragman
01-23-2006, 08:14 AM
I've been folding for months (thanks to this thread originally raising my awareness!). I've been using the command line version, and managing it thru InCrease. I had InCrease set the folding to start at boot time (it adds an "@reboot..." command to my cron file). Sweet.

My system was originally 10.2.8, then 10.3.9, and most recently 10.4.4. I've always done an "Upgrade" when installing a new OS version. Turns out this is important, since under 10.4, cron is deprecated in favor of launchd. If you've upgraded from 10.2 or 10.3, cron is kept around for backward compatibility. If you do an Erase & Install or an Archive & Install though, cron support may be dropped, and the command line folding is not activated by cron at bootup anymore.

The other day, I had to do an Archive & Install, and after which realized that my cron tasks weren't running anymore. After doing some reading on launchd, I was able to develop the equivalent launchd scripts to automatically start folding at boot time.

The details of what I did are over at the TeamMacOSX website (http://teammacosx.homeunix.com/index.html)


...In this thread. (http://teammacosx.homeunix.com/forum/cgi-bin/ikonboard.pl?;act=ST;f=23;t=1829;st=50)

MarkRHolbrook
01-23-2006, 04:57 PM
Used to fold back on PCs... But I joined up. Who knows how long it will be before I post a unit.

Jay Carr
09-02-2007, 03:13 AM
I remembered this post from forever ago and decided that it needed to sit atop the thread list again. I don't know how many of you know about this... Just read the first post and go download the program, okay?

Edit- So I've been running the software on my new MBP, and I'm noticing that it only takes 100% of 1 processor total. Thus, you can still do quite a few tasks while running the program :). Cruising the internet and listening to music is still very functional. I wonder if the new UB version will allow for some controls for that sort of thing. You know, so you can leave a little space for doing small daily tasks...then I Could have it running all the time!

kel101
09-02-2007, 04:27 AM
ive tried many times to use folding at home, but i can never get it to work :( It never runs, and the command line version says it cant get a hold of a work unit, i think there some settings from my previous attempts which need deleting but i dont know where to look

Jay Carr
09-02-2007, 01:27 PM
Go to the notes for the beta version. They have detailed instructions for uninstalling. After you do that, try one of the PPC versions and see how it works.

ArcticStones
09-02-2007, 03:58 PM
...That is SO not true! Stanford's Folding@Home results are being published in peer reviewed scientific journals - meaning first that other scientists are looking carefully at the results to make sure they are valid, and second that the results are available for anyone to read and use.

...

This project is strong independent basic research, funded by scientific agencies of the US government (National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health) because of its intrinsic merit and its potential to move scientific knowledge forward...

Folding@Home is a fine project. I consider myself privileged to participate in it and to introduce it to other computer owners...

Susato,

Thanks for a thorough and clarifying post. And welcome to the Forums!

Best regards,
ArcticStones

GavinBKK
09-02-2007, 09:24 PM
Well I have installed InCrease but I am not sure it is doing anything - take a look at the pic of the gui.

johngpt
09-03-2007, 12:33 AM
Zalister, many thanks for finding and posting this. I clicked the link in the original post to find that it wasn't valid anymore. Backspacing the url a bit got me to the Team Mac OS X site.

Its url is:

http://teammacosx.homeunix.com/

I'll be looking into this. Again, thanks.

susato
01-12-2008, 02:20 PM
Hey GavinBKK - Your screenshot of InCrease indicates an older version (2.2) - it's currently up to 2.3.8 as of November 2007. I'd recommend upgrading - Calxalot keeps adding features and improving the information in the window. There's even a "check for updates" feature under the InCrease menu in the latest version (requires OSX 10.3.9 or higher)

Also, if you go to the Tools menu and hit "Download qd updates" that refreshes the database of work units allowing InCrease to display the full data for the current work unit. I do this every month or so, or if incomplete data is showing for a work unit, as seen in your screenshot.

Another way to see if Folding is running: open Activity Monitor and look for a CPU-intensive process named FahCore_**.exe (the ** represents a two-character wildcard). You'll find one of these per instance of folding on a PPC machine; four of them if you're folding SMP (symmetric multiprocessing) units on an Intel Mac.

And double-clicking on the unit currently folding will bring up the log file, FAHlog.txt, for that work unit, allowing you to check the timestamps in the left hand column. This is coarse tracking at best but useful if you suspect the process has been delayed.

We've been updating lately, so drop by and visit us at http://teammacosx.com - Thanks!

kel101
01-14-2008, 03:00 PM
I have tried F@h many times, but each time i have failed to achieve anything (i think). First of all which version should i install? the console or the smp? When i use the smp, i turn it on in the system preferences, and nothing happens, and i have no way to monitor my progress, and when i click on the app that comes with it my demo is all screwed up

I really want to get into F@H but can someone set me on the right track??

cwtnospam
01-14-2008, 04:59 PM
The Intel smp (multi processor) versions are still beta, so if you're having trouble with them I suggest you report it to the Folding@home website, but first check to see if it is running or not. Open Activity monitor and see if there is a folding process running. You can sort by %CPU, since the folding process(es) should be using the at the highest percentage on both cpus.

susato
01-16-2008, 11:55 PM
The best version IMHO is the console version which can be run from the GUI shell "InCrease" available at the developer's site, www.calxalot.net.

Before you run the console version, you should get rid of all the extra stuff that comes along with the Stanford installer. When you run the installer it puts the following onto your drive:

3 directories (the first one is actually the Folding application):

/Applications/Folding@home.app/*
/Library/PreferencePanes/Folding@home.prefPane/*
/Users/USERNAME/Library/Folding@home/*

and one file:

/Library/LaunchDaemons/Folding@home.plist

Your best bet is to keep the directory
/Users/USERNAME/Library/Folding@home/* which has your client.cfg (configuration) file, your current work unit and your log file, and discard the other three.

Then check to see that there is only one copy of client.cfg and one of FAHlog.txt on your system (they should both be in the /Users/USERNAME/Library/Folding@home directory) Trash any other directories containing FAHlog.txt and client.cfg.

Now you're ready to install InCrease. Download it from Calxalot's site, put it in your applications folder and drag it to the Dock. Open it from the Dock. It will attempt to path to your client.cfg file . If it's not successful, then from the top bar menu select Groups > Create Local Group and enter the path to the directory containing client.cfg.

When you hit the Start icon, InCrease should take over smoothly from there, downloading and installing the latest Folding client, obtaining a work unit, and beginning to fold it.

Hope this has helped - let us know how you are doing with it.

Jay Carr
01-17-2008, 12:08 AM
When are the finally going to get the Universal version going anyway? I'd like to get moving on this again.

Sumleilmus
01-18-2008, 12:29 PM
I seldom visit the Coat Room, and I just found this yesterday.

I've set it up on my two fastest machines already.

Should I ask here or in the UNIX forum if anyone knows how to configure it so it begins folding very soon after startup, and will run in the background even if there is no one logged in, it can run?

I see there's a command line version for the Motorola machines, but I don't see that for the Intel ones.

Thanks for starting this thread and keeping it afloat so I could find it.