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g
05-29-2009, 06:32 AM
Hi,

I have used a font, Cracked, that was already on my Mac.

I have researched as much as I can online to try and find out if it is legal for me to use it or if i need to buy it, for a logo.

As far as I can tell, i think it comes with the Mac so i presume this is ok. As i have inherited this computer I dont know its history.

Can anyone please advise me on the above and:

1) on how you know which fonts are fine to use, in publications, on logos etc
2) if it is just new ones that you have to buy etc?

Thanks

G

benwiggy
05-29-2009, 06:56 AM
You can discover who made the font by doing "Get Info" in FontBook. This will also tell you whether the font allows being embedded within PDFs or EPS files.

You can then check with the foundry what their terms and conditions are. The major foundries - Adobe, Monotype, Linotype, have near identical T&Cs.

Some fonts do have restrictions placed on them, but it is a very poor font that cannot be used in professional artwork. If Graphic Designers were constrained in this way by every font, then nothing would get done.

I would recommend that you outline the text in the logo, so that the font data is converted to vector lines. You can do this in Illustrator, or in Acrobat (Standard or Pro).

Cheech'i
05-29-2009, 07:18 AM
As i have inherited this computer I dont know its history
That is never a good situation to be in, especially if you're concerned with things related to external business.

I'd suggest backup and reinstall OS X at your next opportunity, keeping as little from the previous user as possible.

Hal Itosis
05-29-2009, 08:12 AM
I have used a font, Cracked, that was already on my Mac.

I have researched as much as I can online to try and find out if it is legal for me to use it or if i need to buy it, for a logo.

As far as I can tell, i think it comes with the Mac so i presume this is ok. As i have inherited this computer I dont know its history.

I'm unsure of the legal aspects, but i believe Cracked comes with iWork (not every Mac).

--

Here is its Get Info, as suggested by benwiggy:
PostScript name Cracked
Full name Cracked
Family Cracked
Style Regular
Kind TrueType

Version 1.2
Location /Library/Fonts/Cracked
Unique name Cracked; 1.2; 2006-02-27
Copyright Copyright 1993 House Industries, Brand Design Company. Copyright 2001, 2006 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved.
Enabled Yes
Duplicate No
Copy protected No
Embeddable Yes

g
05-29-2009, 10:08 AM
Hi,

Thanks for the posts.

I did look at the info in Font Book.

As you say its says:

1993 House Industries, Brand Design Company. Copyright 2001, 2006 Apple Computer, Inc.

So does this mean its not from one of the major foundries as mentioned? (The major foundries - Adobe, Monotype, Linotype, have near identical T&Cs.)

G

acme.mail.order
06-01-2009, 03:39 AM
It says Apple, so it's their T&C you need to read.

As it came with a document creation program there is implicit consent to use it in published documents.

If you're going to use it in a logo that is going to be all over the national media it might be worth checking the fine print, otherwise don't worry about it.

g
06-01-2009, 05:02 AM
Hi,

Thanks again for the posts. It is much appreciated.

Final question, where do i find the T&Cs for this on the apple website? It sounds crazy but have searched all over for them and just can't see them. Plenty of support for iTunes and ipods etc but not fonts!

Thank you again very much if anyone can advise.

G

saint.duo
06-01-2009, 01:23 PM
I don't know if its in here, but a good place to start would be...
http://www.apple.com/legal/

cthulhufishing
06-08-2009, 06:34 AM
Some of Apple's system fonts are licensed from other font foundries and modified for the Mac OS. Examples of this are: 'AmericanTypewriter' (ITC & Elsner + Flake), and 'Baskerville' (Monotype). These can be found in Mac TrueType format (.dfont) on more recent releases of the Mac OS.

It would seem that, 'Cracked' was a collaboration with, House Industries but is no longer available as a Mac system font. If you require a legitimate and up to date version of the font then purchasing a licence for the current, House Industries incarnation, 'Crackhouse' would be your best bet. It is available as part of their, 'General Collection' in Macintosh Postscript and OpenType formats.

It is worth reading the font EULA before using the font in any commercial work as restrictions often apply depending on whether the font will be used in print or digital media. Contacting the foundry directly is often the best way to get a clear and concise answer.

Cheech'i
06-08-2009, 07:56 AM
I believe that the user is constrained to the legal use of the font at the time that it was installed. This is true for most of the physical typefaces in a print shop at least. He may already be allowed to use it for anything regardless of the current licensing, since he is not governed by the current licensing unless the licensing at time of purchase/installation mandated or gave him the option. It would have to be one of those two cases, licensing for the user doesn't necessarily change because the distribution license does, unless this is a clause in the licensing by which he is governed.

Legalese is no fun. I'm not a lawyer. Plus, the licensing for fonts/typefaces is purposely unnecessarily complicated. Considering how much is being done on computers and the web, publishers (who at the time owned 90% of the existing fonts) saw the 'desktop publishing' apps start to increase in popularity and decided that since they couldn't control the manufacturing of the physical typeface blocks to control the industry anymore, they wanted to make sure they would still make money when finished digital projects were sent to the printer (digitally) versus typewriter & clipping originated works.

DW8Reaper
03-10-2011, 08:35 AM
I realize I am a year late but I found this thread as I had a similar question about font licensing. It seems according to the OSX (snow leopard anyway) license that you can use a font if it is embeddable as per the Font Book font info.

Have a look at the license (I'm not a lawyer or anything but it seems pretty clear to me) Snow Leopard License (http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/macosx106.pdf), on the first page:

Section 2: Permitted License Uses and Restrictions

D. Fonts. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, you may use the fonts included with the Apple Software to display and print content while running the Apple Software; however, you may only embed fonts in content if that is permitted by the embedding restrictions accompanying the font in question. These embedding restrictions can be found in the Font Book/Preview/Show Font Info panel

Hope this helps.